Newly Released Titles

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A Political Companion to James Baldwin

edited by Susan J. McWilliams with contributions by Susan J. McWilliams, Lawrie Balfour, P.J. Brendese, Susan J. McWilliams, Nicholas Buccola, George Shulman, Vincent Lloyd, Wilson Carey McWilliams, Joel Schlosser, Brian Norman, Ulf Schulenberg, Jack Turner, Lisa Beard, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., and Rachel Brahinsky

In seminal works such as Go Tell It on the Mountain, Notes of a Native Son, and The Fire Next Time, acclaimed author and social critic James Baldwin (1924–1987) expresses his profound belief that writers have the power to transform society, to engage the public, and to inspire and channel conversation to achieve lasting change.

Dying to Eat: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Food, Death, and the Afterlife

edited by Candi K. Cann with contributions by Emily Wu, Jung Eun Sophia Park, Joshua Graham, Lacy K. Crocker, Gordon Fuller, David Oualaalou, Christa Shusko, and Radikobo Ntsimane

Food has played a major role in funerary and memorial practices since the dawn of the human race.

Who Killed Betty Gail Brown? Murder, Mistrial, and Mystery

by Robert G. Lawson

On October 26, 1961, after an evening of studying with friends on the campus of Transylvania University, nineteen-year-old student Betty Gail Brown got into her car around midnight—presumably headed for home.

Miriam Hopkins: Life and Films of a Hollywood Rebel

by Allan R. Ellenberger

Miriam Hopkins (1902–1972) first captured moviegoers’ attention in daring precode films such as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), The Story of Temple Drake (1933), and Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932). Though she enjoyed popular and critical acclaim in her long career—receiving an Academy Award nomination for Becky Sharp (1935) and a Golden Globe nomination for The Heiress (1949)—she is most often remembered for being one of the most difficult actresses of Hollywood’s golden age.

Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film

by Alan K. Rode

Academy Award–winning director Michael Curtiz (1886–1962)—whose best-known films include Casablanca (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Mildred Pierce (1945) and White Christmas (1954)—was in many ways the anti-auteur. During his unprecedented twenty-seven year tenure at Warner Bros.