Newly Released Titles

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Southern History on Screen: Race and Rights, 1976-2016

edited by Bryan M. Jack with contributions by Oliver Gruner, Daniel Farrell, Erik Alexander, Caroline Schroeter, Todd Simpson, Kwakiutl Dreher, Megan Hunt, Gene Kelly, and Tatiana Prorokova

Hollywood films have been influential in the portrayal and representation of race relations in the South and how African Americans are cinematically depicted in history, from The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939) to The Help (2011) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). With an ability to reach mass audiences, films represent the power to influence and shape the public’s understanding of our country’s past, creating lasting images—both real and imagined—in American culture.

The Struggle for Cooperation: Liberated France and the American Military, 1944–1946

by Robert L. Fuller

During World War II, French citizens expressed that the German occupiers behaved more “correctly” than the American combat troops who replaced them.

Reformers to Radicals: The Appalachian Volunteers and the War on Poverty

by Thomas Kiffmeyer

In his inaugural address, President John F. Kennedy challenged Americans to do something for their country.

Frog Pond Philosophy: Essays on the Relationship Between Humans and Nature

by Strachan Donnelley edited by Ceara Donnelley and Bruce Jennings foreword by Frederick L. Kirschenmann

The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942–2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature.

The Politics of Richard Wright: Perspectives on Resistance

edited by Jane Anna Gordon and Cyrus Ernesto Zirakzadeh with contributions by Richard Wright, Lewis R. Gordon, Cedric Robinson, Cyrus Ernesto Zirakzadeh, Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, Floyd W. Hayes III, Paul Gilroy, Lori Marso, Tommy J. Curry, Richard Wright, Kevin Gaines, Dorothy Stringer, Richard Wright, William Dow, Perry S. Moskowitz, James B. Haile III, Richard Wright, Abdul R. JanMohamed, Laura Grattan, and Jane Anna Gordon

A pillar of African American literature, Richard Wright is one of the most celebrated and controversial authors in American history.

The Struggle Is Eternal: Gloria Richardson and Black Liberation

by Joseph R. Fitzgerald

Many prominent and well-known figures greatly impacted the civil rights movement, but one of the most influential and unsung leaders of that period was Gloria Richardson.

A New History of Kentucky, second edition

by James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend

When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state.

Thomas C. Mann: President Johnson, the Cold War, and the Restructuring of Latin American Foreign Policy

by Thomas Tunstall Allcock

Lyndon Johnson was often blamed for abandoning Kennedy’s vision of development and progress in Latin America in favor of his own domestic concerns: anti-communism and economic stability.

Virtues of Renewal: Wendell Berry’s Sustainable Forms

by Jeffrey Bilbro

For over fifty years, Wendell Berry has argued that our most pressing ecological and cultural need is a renewed formal intelligence—a mode of thinking and acting that fosters the health of the earth and its beings.

Paul Rusch in Postwar Japan: Evangelism, Rural Development, and the Battle against Communism

by Andrew T. McDonald and Verlaine Stoner McDonald

Paul Rusch first traveled from Louisville, Kentucky, to Tokyo in 1925 to help rebuild YMCA facilities in the wake of the Great Kanto earthquake.

Amreekiya: A Novel

by Lena Mahmoud

Isra Shadi, a twenty-one-year-old woman of mixed Palestinian and white descent, lives in California with her paternal amu (uncle), amtu (aunt), and cousins after the death of her mother and abandonment by her father at a young age.

Clarence Brown: Hollywood's Forgotten Master

by Gwenda Young foreword by Kevin Brownlow

Greta Garbo proclaimed him as her favorite director.

The Forgotten Front: The Eastern Theater of World War I, 1914 - 1915

edited by Gerhard P. Gross translated by Janice W. Ancker with contributions by Gerhard P. Gross, Hew Strachan, Stig Förster, Gerhard P. Gross, Boris Khavkin, Günther Kronenbitter, Jörg Baberowski, Piotr Szlanta, Hubertus F. Jahn, Peter Hoeres, Eva Horn, Birgit Menzel, Igor Narskij, Hans-Erich Volkmann, Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, Ranier Rother, Christine Beil, Kristiane Janeke, Ranier Rother, Gundula Bavendamm, and Rüdiger Bergien

Although much has been written about the Western Front in World War I, little attention has been given to developments in the east, especially during the crucial period of 1914–1915. Not only did these events have a significant impact on the fighting and outcome of the battles in the west, but all the major combatants in the east ultimately suffered collapses of their political systems with enormous consequences for the future events.

College for the Commonwealth: A Case for Higher Education in American Democracy

by Michael T. Benson and Hal R. Boyd foreword by E. Gordon Gee

In the past decade, states across the nation have cut higher education spending per student by more than 15 percent.

Taking Shergar: Thoroughbred Racing's Most Famous Cold Case

by Milton C. Toby

It was a cold and foggy February night in 1983 when a group of armed thieves crept onto Ballymany Stud, near The Curragh in County Kildare, Ireland, to steal Shergar, one of the Thoroughbred industry’s most renowned stallions.

Mend: Poems

by Kwoya Fagin Maples

The inventor of the speculum, J. Marion Sims, is celebrated as the “father of modern gynecology,” and a memorial at his birthplace honors “his service to suffering women, empress and slave alike.

Jarmila Novotná: My Life in Song

by Jarmila Novotná edited by William V. Madison foreword by Brian Kellow

A legendary beauty, hailed as one of the greatest singing actors of her time, Jarmila Novotná (1907–1994) was an internationally known opera soprano from the former Czechoslovakia.

War and Remembrance: The Story of the American Battle Monuments Commission

by Thomas H. Conner foreword by James Scott Wheeler

"No soldier could ask for a sweeter resting place than on the field of glory where he fell.

Pershing's Tankers: Personal Accounts of the AEF Tank Corps in World War I

edited by Lawrence M. Kaplan foreword by Dale E. Wilson

After the United States declared war against Germany in April 1917, the US Army established the Tank Corps to help break the deadlock of trench warfare in France during World War I. The army envisioned having a large tank force by 1919, but when the war ended in November 1918, only three tank battalions had participated in combat operations.

Drawing the Line: The Untold Story of the Animation Unions from Bosko to Bart Simpson

by Tom Sito

Some of the most beloved characters in film and television inhabit two-dimensional worlds that spring from the fertile imaginations of talented animators.

The Philosophy of War Films

edited by David LaRocca with contributions by David LaRocca, Fredric Jameson, Garrett Stewart, Stacey Peebles, Joshua Gooch, Burke Hilsabeck, Garry L. Hagberg, Robert Burgoyne, Inger S. B. Brodey, Holger Pötzsch, Andrew Fiala, K. L. Evans, Robert Pippin, Lawrence F. Rhu, and Elisabeth Bronfen

Wars have played a momentous role in shaping the course of human history.

Elkhorn: Evolution of a Kentucky Landscape

by Richard Taylor

When former Kentucky Poet Laureate Richard Taylor took a job at Kentucky State University in 1975, he purchased a fixer-upper—in need of a roof, a paint job, city water, and central heating—that became known to his friends as “Taylor’s Folly.

The Myth and Reality of German Warfare: Operational Thinking from Moltke the Elder to Heusinger

by Gerhard P. Gross edited by David T. Zabecki foreword by Robert M. Citino

Surrounded by potential adversaries, nineteenth-century Prussia and twentieth-century Germany faced the formidable prospect of multifront wars and wars of attrition.

Moonshiners and Prohibitionists: The Battle over Alcohol in Southern Appalachia

by Bruce E. Stewart

Homemade liquor has played a prominent role in the Appalachian economy for nearly two centuries.

World Politics on Screen: Understanding International Relations through Popular Culture

by Mark Sachleben

Increasingly resistant to lessons on international politics, society often turns to television and film to engage the subject.