Newly Released Titles

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Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage: Two Hundred Years of Southern Cuisine and Culture

by John van Willigen

Food is a significant part of our daily lives and can be one of the most telling records of a time and place.

Conversations with Legendary Television Stars: Interviews from the First Fifty Years

by James Bawden and Ron Miller

During television’s first fifty years—long before cable networks, Hulu, Netflix, and the like—families would gather around their television sets nightly to watch entertaining shows such as I Love Lucy, Gunsmoke, M*A*S*H, The Beverly Hillbillies, Fantasy Island, and The Rockford Files.

The Legacy of J. William Fulbright: Policy, Power, and Ideology

edited by Alessandro Brogi, Giles Scott-Smith, and David J. Snyder with contributions by Randall B. Woods, Neal Allen, Frédérick Gagnon, Benjamin Brady, David L. Prentice, Justin Hart, Sam Lebovic, Lonnie Johnson, Molly Bettie, Alice Garner, Diane Kirkby, Hannah Higgin, Carla Konta, and Guanqui Xu

This insightful collection of essays details the political life of one of the most prominent and gifted American statesmen of the twentieth century.

Chromatic Homes: The Design and Coloring Book

by John I. Gilderbloom

This coloring book is like no other on the market.

JFK and de Gaulle: How America and France Failed in Vietnam, 1961-1963

by Sean J. McLaughlin

Despite French President Charles de Gaulle’s persistent efforts to constructively share French experience and use his resources to help engineer an American exit from Vietnam, the Kennedy administration responded to de Gaulle’s peace initiatives with bitter silence and inaction.

For a Voice and the Vote: My Journey with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

by Lisa Anderson Todd

During the summer of 1964, hundreds of American college students descended on Mississippi to help the state’s African American citizens register to vote.

The Social Documentary Photography of Milton Rogovin

edited by Christopher Fulton with contributions by Elizabeth E. Reilly, Cynthia Negrey, Catherine Fosl, Peter S. Fosl, John T. Cumbler, Karen Christopher, Joy Gleason Carew, Thomas B. Byers, and Tracy E. K'Meyer foreword by Michael Frisch

Milton Rogovin (1909–2011) dedicated his photographic career to capturing the humanity of working-class people around the world—coal miners, factory workers, the urban poor, the residents of Appalachia, and other marginalized groups.

A Brief History of Northern Kentucky

by Robert D. Webster foreword by Paul A. Tenkotte

Thousands of years ago, the land that would become Northern Kentucky emerged above sea level when a large portion of the continental plate bulged upward.

Boonesborough Unearthed: Frontier Archaeology at a Revolutionary Fort

by Nancy O'Malley

Throughout the Revolutionary War, Fort Boonesborough was one of the most important and defensively crucial sites on the western frontier.

The Political Career of W. Kerr Scott: The Squire from Haw River

by Julian Pleasants

When W. Kerr Scott (1896–1958) began his campaign for the North Carolina gubernatorial seat in 1948, his opponents derided his candidacy as a farce.

The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman

edited by David LaRocca

From the Academy Award-winning Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) and Academy Award-nominated Adaptation (2002) to the cult classic Being John Malkovich (1999), screenwriter Charlie Kaufman is widely admired for his innovative, philosophically resonant films.

Landpower in the Long War: Projecting Force After 9/11

edited by Jason W. Warren foreword by Daniel P. Bolger with contributions by Lukas Milevski, Peter R. Mansoor, Joel Hillison, Donald S. Travis, Frank Sobchak, Gregory Roberts, James DiCrocco, Mark Balboni, Paul Westermeyer, William Waddell, Edward A. Gutiérrez, Eric Setzekorn, Ibrahim Al-Marashi, David Fastabend, John A. Bonin, Jon Middaugh, Charles Luke, Chris Bowers, Alex Willard, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Lawrence Tritle epilogue by J. Casey Doss

War and landpower’s role in the twenty-first century is not just about military organizations, tactics, operations, and technology; it is also about strategy, policy, and social and political contexts.

The Rising Clamor: The American Press, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the Cold War

by David P. Hadley

The US intelligence community as it currently exists has been deeply influenced by the press.

The US Senate and the Commonwealth: Kentucky Lawmakers and the Evolution of Legislative Leadership

by Senator Mitch McConnell and Roy E. Brownell II afterword by Senator Lamar Alexander

Kentucky has long punched above its weight in the US Senate, as some of the nation’s most distinguished senators have hailed from the Commonwealth.

Hitchcock and the Censors

by John Billheimer

Throughout his career, Alfred Hitchcock had to deal with a wide variety of censors attuned to the slightest suggestion of sexual innuendo, undue violence, toilet humor, religious disrespect, and all forms of indecency, real or imagined.

Cover Name: Dr. Rantzau

by Nikolaus Ritter edited and translated by Katharine R. Wallace foreword by Mary Kathryn Barbier

Cover Name: Dr. Rantzau is a gripping diary-like personal account of espionage during the Second World War and is one of very few historic memoirs written by an ex-Abwehr officer.

Decision in the Atlantic: The Allies and the Longest Campaign of the Second World War

edited by Marcus Faulkner and Christopher M. Bell with contributions by Marc Milner, Christopher M. Bell, Kevin Smith, Tim Benbow, Ben Jones, James Goldrick, Marcus Faulkner, Kevin Smith, G. H. Bennett, and David Kohnen

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest campaign of the Second World War.

Pop Culture and the Dark Side of the American Dream: Con Men, Gangsters, Drug Lords, and Zombies

by Paul A. Cantor

The many con men, gangsters, and drug lords portrayed in popular culture are examples of the dark side of the American dream.

Ridley Scott: A Biography

by Vincent LoBrutto

With celebrated works such as Alien, Blade Runner, Thelma & Louise, and Gladiator, Ridley Scott has secured his place in Hollywood.

Sabers through the Reich: World War II Corps Cavalry from Normandy to the Elbe

by William Stuart Nance foreword by Robert M. Citino

In Sabers through the Reich, William Stuart Nance provides the first comprehensive operational history of American corps cavalry in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during World War II. The corps cavalry had a substantive and direct impact on Allied success in almost every campaign, and served as offensive guards for armies across Europe, conducting reconnaissance, economy of force, and security missions, as well as prisoner of war rescues.

Olivia de Havilland: Lady Triumphant

by Victoria Amador

Legendary actress and two-time Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland is best known for her role as Melanie Wilkes in Gone with the Wind (1939). She often inhabited characters who were delicate, elegant, and refined.

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

by Jennifer S. Kelly foreword by Steve Haskin

He was always destined to be a champion.

Biplanes at War: US Marine Corps Aviation in the Small Wars Era, 1915-1934

by Wray R. Johnson

Unlike the relative uniformity of conventional warfare, the peculiarities of small wars prevent a clear definition of rules and roles for military forces to follow.

Lectures of the Air Corps Tactical School and American Strategic Bombing in World War II

edited and with commentary by Phil Haun

Following the cataclysmic losses suffered in World War I, air power theorists in Europe advocated for long-range bombers to overfly the trenches and strike deep into the enemy’s heartland.

Foreign Friends: Syngman Rhee, American Exceptionalism, and the Division of Korea

by David P. Fields

The division of Korea in August 1945 was one of the most consequential foreign policy decisions of the twentieth century.