Newly Released Titles

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Cover Name: Dr. Rantzau

by Nikolaus Ritter edited and translated by Katharine R. Wallace foreword by Mary Kathryn Barbier

Cover Name: Dr. Rantzau is a gripping diary-like personal account of espionage during the Second World War and is one of very few historic memoirs written by an ex-Abwehr officer.

Decision in the Atlantic: The Allies and the Longest Campaign of the Second World War

edited by Marcus Faulkner and Christopher M. Bell with contributions by Marc Milner, Christopher M. Bell, Kevin Smith, Tim Benbow, Ben Jones, James Goldrick, Marcus Faulkner, Kevin Smith, G. H. Bennett, and David Kohnen

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest campaign of the Second World War.

Pop Culture and the Dark Side of the American Dream: Con Men, Gangsters, Drug Lords, and Zombies

by Paul A. Cantor

The many con men, gangsters, and drug lords portrayed in popular culture are examples of the dark side of the American dream.

Ridley Scott: A Biography

by Vincent LoBrutto

With celebrated works such as Alien, Blade Runner, Thelma & Louise, and Gladiator, Ridley Scott has secured his place in Hollywood.

Sabers through the Reich: World War II Corps Cavalry from Normandy to the Elbe

by William Stuart Nance foreword by Robert M. Citino

In Sabers through the Reich, William Stuart Nance provides the first comprehensive operational history of American corps cavalry in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during World War II. The corps cavalry had a substantive and direct impact on Allied success in almost every campaign, and served as offensive guards for armies across Europe, conducting reconnaissance, economy of force, and security missions, as well as prisoner of war rescues.

Olivia de Havilland: Lady Triumphant

by Victoria Amador

Legendary actress and two-time Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland is best known for her role as Melanie Wilkes in Gone with the Wind (1939). She often inhabited characters who were delicate, elegant, and refined.

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

by Jennifer S. Kelly foreword by Steve Haskin

He was always destined to be a champion.

Biplanes at War: US Marine Corps Aviation in the Small Wars Era, 1915-1934

by Wray R. Johnson

Unlike the relative uniformity of conventional warfare, the peculiarities of small wars prevent a clear definition of rules and roles for military forces to follow.

Lectures of the Air Corps Tactical School and American Strategic Bombing in World War II

edited and with commentary by Phil Haun

Following the cataclysmic losses suffered in World War I, air power theorists in Europe advocated for long-range bombers to overfly the trenches and strike deep into the enemy’s heartland.

Foreign Friends: Syngman Rhee, American Exceptionalism, and the Division of Korea

by David P. Fields

The division of Korea in August 1945 was one of the most consequential foreign policy decisions of the twentieth century.

Maxwell Taylor’s Cold War: From Berlin to Vietnam

by Ingo Trauschweizer

General Maxwell Taylor served at the nerve centers of US military policy and Cold War strategy and experienced firsthand the wars in Korea and Vietnam, as well as crises in Berlin and Cuba.

Lincoln, Seward, and US Foreign Relations in the Civil War Era

by Joseph A. Fry

The Civil War marked a significant turning point in American history—not only for the United States itself but also for its relations with foreign powers both during and after the conflict.

Wild Yet Tasty: A Guide to Edible Plants of Eastern Kentucky

by Dan Dourson and Judy Dourson illustrated by Dan Dourson

Eastern Kentucky is home to a number of breathtaking natural attractions.

Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis

by Keona K. Ervin

Like most of the nation during the 1930s, St. Louis, Missouri, was caught in the stifling grip of the Great Depression.

Adolph Rupp and the Rise of Kentucky Basketball

by James Duane Bolin

Known as the “Man in the Brown Suit” and “The Baron of the Bluegrass,” Adolph Rupp (1901–1977) is a towering figure in the history of college athletics.

Living Sustainably: What Intentional Communities Can Teach Us about Democracy, Simplicity, and Nonviolence

by A. Whitney Sanford

In light of concerns about food and human health, fraying social ties, economic uncertainty, and rampant consumerism, some people are foregoing a hurried, distracted existence and embracing a mindful way of living.

Wildflowers and Ferns of Red River Gorge and the Greater Red River Basin

by Dan Dourson and Judy Dourson

The Red River Gorge’s intricate canyon system features an abundance of high sandstone cliffs, rock shelters, waterfalls, and natural bridges, making it one of the world’s top rock-climbing destinations.

Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship

by David P. Oakley

Since September 11, 2001, the CIA and DoD have operated together in Afghanistan, Iraq, and during counterterrorism operations.

Fishing the Jumps: A Novel

by Lamar Herrin

But in fishing the jumps there comes a moment when an insatiable hunger rises up in you and everything turns wild.

The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924-1945

by Yan Xu

Based on groundbreaking research, this book is the first of its kind to provide a close examination in English of the extensive imagery of the soldier figure in the war culture of early twentieth-century China.

Slaves, Slaveholders, and a Kentucky Community's Struggle Toward Freedom

by Elizabeth D. Leonard

Countless lives were transformed by the war that split the nation, and many stories are yet to be revealed about how the Civil War and the Reconstruction era affected Kentuckians.

War in the American Pacific and East Asia, 1941-1972

edited by Hal M. Friedman with contributions by Rebecca Robbins Raines, Steven C. Call, Stephen Houseknecht, Josh Levy, Katherine Reist, Nicholas E. Sarantakes, Sarandis Papadopoulos, and David Ulbrich

Before 1940, the Japanese empire stood as the greatest single threat to the American presence in the Pacific and East Asia.

Southern History on Screen: Race and Rights, 1976-2016

edited by Bryan M. Jack with contributions by Oliver Gruner, Daniel Farrell, Erik Alexander, Caroline Schroeter, Todd Simpson, Kwakiutl Dreher, Megan Hunt, Gene Kelly, and Tatiana Prorokova

Hollywood films have been influential in the portrayal and representation of race relations in the South and how African Americans are cinematically depicted in history, from The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939) to The Help (2011) and 12 Years a Slave (2013). With an ability to reach mass audiences, films represent the power to influence and shape the public’s understanding of our country’s past, creating lasting images—both real and imagined—in American culture.

The Struggle for Cooperation: Liberated France and the American Military, 1944–1946

by Robert L. Fuller

During World War II, French citizens expressed that the German occupiers behaved more “correctly” than the American combat troops who replaced them.

Reformers to Radicals: The Appalachian Volunteers and the War on Poverty

by Thomas Kiffmeyer

In his inaugural address, President John F. Kennedy challenged Americans to do something for their country.