Titles in the selected series

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Remembering The Battle of the Crater: War as Murder

by Kevin M. Levin

The battle of the Crater is known as one of the Civil War’s bloodiest struggles—a Union loss with combined casualties of 5,000, many of whom were members of the United States Colored Troops (USCT) under Union Brigadier General Edward Ferrero.

A Rape in the Early Republic: Gender and Legal Culture in an 1806 Virginia Trial

by Alexander Smyth edited by Randal L. Hall

On January 14, 1806, Sidney Hanson was raped by John Deskins on a rough gravel path in the woods in Tazewell County, Virginia.

Willis Duke Weatherford: Race, Religion, and Reform in the American South

by Andrew McNeill Canady

At the turn of the twentieth century, few white, southern leaders would speak out in favor of racial equality for fear of being dismissed as too progressive.

My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South

by Sergio A. Lussana

Trapped in a world of brutal physical punishment and unremitting, back-breaking labor, Frederick Douglass mused that it was the friendships he shared with other enslaved men that carried him through his darkest days.

Cultivating Race: The Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750-1860

by Watson W. Jennison

From the eighteenth century to the eve of the Civil War, Georgia’s racial order shifted from the somewhat fluid conception of race prevalent in the colonial era to the harsher understanding of racial difference prevalent in the antebellum era.